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Explore Our Trades

Considering a career in the building trades? Explore Our Trades is your starting point. For each building trade, you will find:

  • a detailed description of the type of work involved
  • a list of important skills and abilities
  • apprenticeship requirements
  • a contact to answer your questions

When you are done, check out Apprentice Opportunities to learn more about how you can become an apprentice and Training Opportunities to find out about Alberta's world-class training centres.


Automotive Service Technician

What is an Automotive Service Technician?

Automotive service technicians perform preventative maintenance, diagnose faulty operations, and repair automotive vehicles and light trucks.

Automotive service technicians adjust, test and repair engines, steering systems, braking systems, drive trains, vehicle suspensions, electrical systems and air-conditioning systems, and do wheel alignments. In large shops, they sometimes specialize in repairing, rebuilding and servicing specific parts (e.g., transmissions, engines, electrical components, etc.). In smaller shops, automotive service technicians may work on a wider variety of repair jobs.

Automotive service technicians begin by reading the work order and examining the vehicle. To locate the cause of faulty operation and repair it, they:

  • use testing equipment, take the vehicle for a test drive, and/or refer to manufacturers' specifications and manuals;
  • dismantle faulty assemblies, repair or replace worn or damaged parts; and
  • reassemble, adjust and test the repaired mechanism.

Automotive service technicians also may:

  • perform scheduled maintenance services such as oil changes, lubrications and tune ups; and
  • advise customers on work performed, general vehicle conditions and future repair requirements.

Skills & Abilities

The work is most rewarding for those who enjoy doing precise work that is varied and challenging. Also, they usually like on-the-job security and a feeling of independence.

To be successful in the trade, automotive service technicians need:

  • good hearing, eyesight and manual dexterity;
  • mechanical aptitude and interest;
  • the ability to use proper lifting techniques for items up to 25 kilograms;
  • the ability to keep up to date with changing technology; and
  • a working knowledge of electricity, electronics and computers.

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for an automotive service technician is 4 years (four 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1500 hours of on-the-job training and 8 weeks of technical training each year.

  • An applicant who previously completed courses of study or work experience related to the Automotive Service Technician trade or holds a related journeyperson certificate and has the employer's recommendation, may qualify for credit that could reduce the term of apprenticeship.
  • A person who has previous training or work experience in the trade and wants to determine their level of skill and knowledge for entry or advanced standing in an apprenticeship program may apply for a Prior Learning Assessment.

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as an Automotive Service Technician, contact the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 955.

The International Union of Operating Engineers Local 955

International Union of Operating Engineers Local 955 logo

Online

http://www.iuoe955.com

Location

Edmonton

Head Office
17603 - 114 Ave
Edmonton, Alberta T5S 2R9
Phone No. (780) 483-0955
Fax No. (780) 483-1998

Calgary

#201, 1212 - 31 Ave NE
Calgary, Alberta T2E 7S8
Phone No. (403) 250-3840
Fax No. (403) 250-3916

Fort McMurray

258 Gregoire Drive
Fort McMurray, Alberta T9H 4K6
Phone No.(780) 790-1713
Fax No.(780) 743-2582

Edson

#201, 4924-1st Avenue
Edson, Alberta T7E 1T69
Phone No. (780) 723-5955
Fax No. (780) 723-7540

Boilermaker

What is a Boilermaker?

A Boilermaker is a team player, committed to safety, who is reliable, physically fit, adventurous, willing to stand up for what’s right, perseveres to complete the job, has the patience to get it done right, willing to learn, willing to teach, a problem-solver, likes heights, comfortable in confined spaces, willing to work varied shifts and likes to travel.

Boilermakers build, erect, repair, test and maintain all types of boilers, tanks and pressure vessels, and perform all types of structural and plate work on dust, air, gas, steam oil, water and other liquid-tight pressure vessels.

Boilermakers work in industrial plants such as oil refineries, heavy oil extraction and upgraders, chemical and fertilizer, cement, pulp and paper, power, water treatment, nuclear power, hydro electric and liquefied natural gas. They also work in co-generation facilities, steel mills, ship building facilities and fabrication shops.

Boilermakers perform precision work in tight spaces, work at heights above 200 feet and fabricate and installs massive vessels.

To fabricate and repair boilers, tanks, heat exchangers, fired heaters, reactors and other pressure vessels, Boilermakers:

  • Read blueprints and plan the sequence of work to be done
  • Develop a layout and transfer that information onto the metal
  • Cut and join metal using oxy-fuel equipment and welding machines
  • Fit together metal components and tack in place for welding
  • Work on heavy lift crews to move large vessels and components into place

Skills & Abilities

Successful Boilermakers tend to enjoy:

  • Working with tools, equipment and machinery
  • Doing complex precision work and problem solving
  • Doing work that involves a degree of excitement and variety

To be successful in their trade, Boilermakers need:

  • The strength and stamina required to work with heavy parts and equipment weighing in excess of 25 kilograms (55lbs)
  • Good coordination, mechanical aptitude and manual dexterity
  • The ability to tolerate heights, temperatures extremes, noisy and dusty surroundings
  • The ability to work in confined spaces

Apprenticeship Training

To start an apprenticeship as a Boilermaker or Welder you can attend an Apprentice Recruitment Information Seminar (ARIS) at the Boilermaker Apprenticeship & Training Centre. This informative seminar gives you detailed information about the trade so you can decide if it is the right career for you. Once accepted through our application process you will be invited to attend WorkSmart pre-apprenticeship training to get you ready for employment with the Boilermakers.

Visit the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers - Local 146 website for upcoming Apprentice Recruitment Information Seminar (ARIS) dates.

WorkSmart is a comprehensive course about the Boilermaker and Welder trades that introduces our high safety standards, industry practices and workplace culture.

The term of apprenticeship for a Boilermaker is 3 years (three 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1500 hours of on-the-job training and 8 weeks of technical training each year.

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Boilermaker, contact the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers Local 146.

International Brotherhood of Boilermakers Local 146

International Brotherhood of Boilermakers - Local 146 logo

Online

http://www.boilermakers.ca

Location

Calgary

11055 - 48 St SE
Calgary, Alberta, T2C 1G8
Phone (403) 253-6976
Fax (403) 252-4187

Edmonton

15330 - 114 Ave
Edmonton, Alberta, T5M 2Z2
Phone (780) 451-5889
Fax (780) 451-3927

Boom Truck Operator

What is a Boom Truck Operator?

Crane and hoisting equipment operators service and operate the hoist and swing equipment used to move machinery, materials and other large objects.Boom truck operatorsset up, service and operate hydraulic booms that are mounted on turrets that are affixed to trucks and are capable of moving heavy loads.

Operators manipulate a number of pedals and levers to rotate the crane and raise and lower loads. They often perform all or some of these operations simultaneously.

Certification is required when operating:

  • booms (including telescoping booms and articulating booms possessing live lines) capable of swinging, hoisting and booming up and down with a lifting capacity of greater than 5 tons (4.5 tonnes) and less than 45 tons (40.8 tonnes)
  • articulating booms WITHOUT live lines with a lifting capacity of greater than 8 tons (7.3 tonnes) and less than 45 tons (40.8 tonnes)

Boom truck operators are employed by general contractors and subcontractors in the forestry, mining, construction and oil industries, and by crane rental companies. Employment prospects change with seasonal and economic climates. Many crane operators are members of unions.

Journeyperson wage rates vary, but generally range from $16 to $28 an hour plus benefits.

Experienced boom truck operators may advance to supervisory positions, or set up their own crane rental businesses.

Crane and hoisting equipment operators – boom truck (boom truck operators) work outdoors, often in noisy, dusty conditions. They work in various locations throughout Alberta, in all types of weather. A 40-hour, five-day week is normal, but overtime may be required to meet construction deadlines.

Occupational hazards include injuries resulting from power line contact, crane overload, falls, weather conditions or manual lifting.

Skills & Abilities

Successful boom truck operators are capable decision-makers prepared to work independently when necessary. Yet they also enjoy the comradery of being part of a team and traveling to different locations. They often like variety in their work.

To be successful in the trade, boom truck operators need:

  • coordination and manual dexterity
  • the ability to work at heights
  • the strength, stamina, and ability to use proper lifting techniques to lift items weighing in excess of 25 kilograms
  • good vision
  • the ability to work as part of a team and communicate with ground crews, usually using hand signals and voice communication

Apprenticeship Training

To work as a boom truck operator in Alberta, a person must be a registered apprentice, an Alberta-certified journeyperson, or hold a valid recognized credential.

The term of apprenticeship for a boom truck operator is 1 year (one 12-month period) including a minimum of 1200 hours of on-the-job training and 5 or 6 weeks of technical training subject to the training institutes*.

* 5 week training program requires 30 hours of self-study prior to commencing technical training.

A high school student can become an apprentice and gain credits toward apprenticeship training and a high school diploma at the same time under the Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP).

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Boom Truck Operator, contact the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 955.

The International Union of Operating Engineers Local 955

International Union of Operating Engineers Local 955 logo

Online

http://www.iuoe955.com

Location

Edmonton

Head Office
17603 - 114 Ave
Edmonton, Alberta T5S 2R9
Phone No. (780) 483-0955
Fax No. (780) 483-1998

Calgary

#201, 1212 - 31 Ave NE
Calgary, Alberta T2E 7S8
Phone No. (403) 250-3840
Fax No. (403) 250-3916

Fort McMurray

258 Gregoire Drive
Fort McMurray, Alberta T9H 4K6
Phone No.(780) 790-1713
Fax No.(780) 743-2582

Edson

#201, 4924-1st Avenue
Edson, Alberta T7E 1T69
Phone No. (780) 723-5955
Fax No. (780) 723-7540

Bricklayer

What is a Bricklayer?

Bricklayers prepare, lay brick and other masonry units to construct and repair structures such as walls, partitions,patios, arches, fireplaces and chimneys.

Bricklayers work with masonry materials such as brick, concrete blocks, granite stones, structural tile and pre-cast panels. They also lay or install fire brick or castable materials in commercial and industrial furnaces, incinerators, acid tile, and acid brick in pulp mills.

In general, bricklayers:

  • Interpret drawings, and blueprints, and calculate the materials required
  • Measure from an established starting point and construct corners first, using a plumb line and mason’s level to ensure each layer will be level from corner to corner
  • Spread mortar over the base or previous layer, spread more mortar on one end of each brick to be laid, and lay the bricks into position
  • Remove excess mortar after the brick (or other masonry material) is in position
  • Use a hammer and chisel or a masonry saw to cut bricks to fit, as required
  • Bricklayers must know the properties of various mortars and other bonding materials, and how to handle different types of masonry units.

Skills & Abilities

The work is most rewarding for those who enjoy working with their hands on a variety of projects, which sometimes require creativity.

To be successful in their trade, bricklayers need:

  • The strength and stamina required to work with heavy tools and materials weighing between 11 and 25 kilograms
  • Manual dexterity and a good sense of balance
  • The ability to get along well with co-workers
  • An eye for colour, line and proportion

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for a bricklayer is 3 years (three 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1600 hours of on the-job training and 8 weeks of technical training each year.

An applicant who previously completed courses of study or work experience related to the Bricklayer trade or holds a related journeyman certificate and has the employer’s recommendation, may qualify for credit that could reduce the term of apprenticeship.

A person who has previous training or work experience in the trade and wants to determine their level of skill and knowledge for entry or advanced standing in an apprenticeship program may apply for a Prior Learning Assessment.

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Bricklayer, contact the International Union of Bricklayers & Allied Craftsmen Local 1.

International Union of Bricklayers & Allied Craftsmen Local 1

International Union of Bricklayers & Allied Craftsmen - Local 1 logo

Online

http://www.bacedmonton.ca

Location

Calgary

#100, 5325 - 1A St SW
Calgary, Alberta, T2H 0E5
Phone (403) 252-2180
Fax (403) 252-5495

Edmonton

International Union of Bricklayers & Allied Craftsmen - Local 1
10724 - 113 St. NW
Edmonton, Alberta T5H 3H8
Phone (780) 426-7545
Fax (780) 425-9201

Camp Worker

UNITE HERE Local 47 supplies workers through our hiring hall to work in remote camps in Northern Alberta.

What does it take to become a member of UNITE HERE Local 47? Dedication, Responsibility, relevant Experience, Commitment, Willingness to Learn, Honesty and a Desire to do the best job you possibly can.

UNITE HERE Local 47 is proud to be the Union who makes remote camp living comfortable with good food and clean rooms – a home away from home for thousands of Trades people.

Are you a Chef with your Journeyman Red Seal certification?
Are you a certified Baker?
Have you worked in restaurants or industrial kitchens doing dishes or preparing food?
Do you know how to make salads or sandwiches for 2000 people?
Can you strip and wax floors?
Have you worked in hotels cleaning rooms?
Do you have retail experience and are you 6/49 certified?
Are you an experienced Bartender or Server?
Do you have CSTS & OSSA training certificates?

If you have what it takes and you have any of these qualifications please submit a resume with copies of all certificates (CSTS & OSSA certificates required). Be sure to list all relevant experience and detailed contact information – listing all possible phone numbers. Your resume will be kept on file for three months. Pre-access drug and alcohol testing is required by all employers.

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Camp Worker, contact UNITE-HERE Local 47.

UNITE-HERE Local 47

UNITE-HERE - Local 47 logo

Online

http://www.local47.net

Location

12836-146 Street
Edmonton, Alberta, T5L 2H7
Main office phone: 780-426-7890
FAX: 780-426-5098
Toll Free: 1-888-801-4373

Carpenter

What is a Carpenter?

Carpenters construct, erect and repair buildings and other structures made of wood, wood substitutes, steel and other materials.

Duties vary according to the type of job.

In residential jobs, carpenters crib the basement; build the house framework, walls, roof, exterior and interior finishes; and install doors, windows, flooring, cabinets, stairs, handrails, paneling, molding and ceiling tiles.

In commercial or industrial jobs, they build concrete forms, scaffolding, bridges, trestles, tunnels, shelters, towers and other structures.

In maintenance jobs, they repair and remodel existing structures of all kinds.

Some carpenters specialize in one type of work such as framing, bench work or finishing work.

Most carpentry tasks involve:

  • Reading blueprints and/or getting instructions from a supervisor
  • Doing the layout including selecting materials, planning sequences and methods of work, measuring and marking materials to avoid costly mistakes or omissions
  • Cutting and shaping materials and joining them with nails, screws, bolts or glue
  • Checking completed units to be sure they are level, square, plumb and the right size, shape and location

Skills & Abilities

The work is most rewarding for those who take pride in creating a variety of things with their hands and honing their expertise in woodcraft.

To be successful in the trade carpenters need:

  • The ability to stand, crouch and kneel for long periods of time
  • Manual dexterity
  • Balance for working on scaffolding
  • The ability to lift between 11 and 25 kilograms
  • The ability to solve arithmetic problems quickly and accurately
  • The ability to get along well with others

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for a carpenter is 4 years (four 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1360 hours of on-the-job training and 8 weeks of technical training each year.

An applicant who previously completed courses of study or work experience related to the Carpenter trade or holds a related journeyman certificate and has the employer’s recommendation, may qualify for credit that could reduce the term of apprenticeship.

A person who has previous training or work experience in the trade and wants to determine their level of skill and knowledge for entry or advanced standing in an apprenticeship program may apply for a Prior Learning Assessment.

To learn the skills required of a carpenter in Alberta and be issued an Alberta Journeyman Certificate, a person must find a suitable employer who is willing to hire and train an apprentice.

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Carpenter, contact the Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers Local 1325 or Local 2103.

The Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers Local 1325

Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers - Local 1325

Online

http://www.albertacarpenters.com

Location

15210 - 123 Ave NW
Edmonton, Alberta, T5V 0A3
Phone No. (780) 471-3200
Fax No. (780) 477-7143
Toll Free No. 1-800-272-7905

The Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers Local 2103

Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers Local 2103 logo

Online

http://www.albertacarpenters.com

Location

2626 23 Street NE
Calgary, Alberta
T2E 8L2
Phone No. (403) 283-0747
Fax No. (403) 283-6425

Cement Mason - Concrete Finisher

What is a Cement Mason?

Concrete finishers place and finish concrete floors, sidewalks, curbs, bridge decks and other concrete structures.

Concrete finishers apply:

  • Smooth or textured finishes to concrete surfaces
  • Exposed aggregate finishes
  • Stamped and patterned designs
  • Water proofing and restore concrete surfaces

They have the knowledge to properly use:

  • Grouts from dry pack to wet applications
  • Epoxy and cementitious materials
  • Concrete curing compounds

In general, concrete finishers:

  • Place and finish concrete in forms and slabs
  • Use wide variety of power tools in their trade for cutting, coring, chipping, grinding, and the roughening of concrete surfaces for grouting and special coatings
  • Level and smooth the surface, round the edges, and make joints or grooves to help control cracking on the surface
  • Use machines such as power trowels and ride-on power trowels to finish large factory and warehouse floors
  • Hand-trowelling is still required for hard-to-reach areas in corners, around pipes and edges

Skills & Abilities

This trade is physically demanding but most rewarding for those who take pride in seeing the finished product of their work.

To be successful in this trade, concrete finishers need:

  • Thorough knowledge of the different types, strengths and set times of concrete
  • Technical application skills and product knowledge of various protective coatings and restoration products

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship is 3 years (three 12 month periods) including a minimum of 1200 hours of on-the-job training and 4 week technical training in the first and second years, and 1200 hours of on-the job training in the third year.

An applicant who previously completed courses or work experience related to the Concrete Finisher trade may qualify for credit that could reduce the term of apprenticeship.

Check out Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training at http://www.tradesecrets.gov.ab.ca

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Cement Mason - Concrete Finisher, contact the Operative Plasterers and Cement Masons International Local 222.

Operative Plasterers and Cement Masons International Local 222

Operative Plasterers and Cement Masons International - Local 222 logo

Online

http://www.local222.com

Location

Edmonton

#42, 4004 – 97 Street NW
Edmonton, Alberta, T6E 6N1
Phone: (780) 423-4296
Fax: (780) 423-4271
Email: www.local222.com

Calgary

Phone: (403) 258-0042

Electrician

What is an Electrician?

Electricians install, alter, repair and maintain electrical systems designed to provide heat, light, power, control, signal or fire alarms for all types of buildings, structures and premises.

In general, electricians:

  • Read and interpret electrical, mechanical and architectural drawings and electrical code specifications to determine wiring layouts
  • Cut, thread, bend, assemble and install conduits and other types of electrical conductor enclosures and fittings
  • Pull wire through conduits and holes in walls and floors
  • Position, maintain and install distribution and control equipment such as switches, relays, circuit breaker panels and fuse enclosures
  • Install, replace, maintain and repair electrical systems and related electrical equipment
  • Install data cabling
  • Splice, join and connect wire to form circuits
  • Test circuits to ensure integrity and safety
  • Install and maintain fiber optic systems

Skills & Abilities

To be successful in the trade, electricians need:

  • Good communication and reading skills
  • An aptitude for Mathematics
  • Mechanical ability, strength and manual dexterity
  • The ability to distinguish colours to work with colour-coded wiring
  • The ability to work at heights
  • The ability to lift between 11 and 25 kilograms
  • The ability to get along well with co-workers
  • The willingness to keep up with new developments in the field
  • The ability to create new ways of doing thing
  • The ability to do very precise work expertly
  • Ability to work at a variety of exciting tasks

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for an electrician is 4 years (four 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1500 hours of on-the-job training and 8 weeks of technical training in the first three years, and a minimum of 1350 hours of on-the-job training and 12 weeks of technical training in the fourth year.

An applicant who previously completed courses of study or work experience related to the Electrician trade or holds a related journeyman certificate and has the employer’s recommendation, may qualify for credit that could reduce the term of apprenticeship.

A person who has previous training or work experience in the trade and wants to determine their level of skill and knowledge for entry or advanced standing in an apprenticeship program may apply for a Prior Learning Assessment.

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as an Electrician, contact the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 424.

International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 424

International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers - Local 424 logo

Online

http://www.ibew424.net
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Twitter
YouTube

Location

Calgary

3623 - 29 St NE
Calgary, Alberta T1Y 5W4
Phone No. (403) 717-0322
Fax No. (403) 717-0326

Edmonton

4232 - 93 St
Edmonton, Alberta T6E 5P5
Phone No. (780) 462-5076
Fax No. (780) 450-0461

Fort McMurray

Suite 206
10020 Franklin Ave
Fort McMurray, Alberta T9H 2K6
Phone No. (780) 791-4727
Fax No. (780) 743-8501

Elevator Constructor

What is an Elevator Constructor?

Elevator constructors install, modify, service and repair electric and hydraulic elevators, personnel and man-hoists, moving walkways, stagelifts, escalators and related equipment.

Elevator constructors may specialize in construction, maintenance or repair work.

In general, elevator constructors and their apprentices:

  • read and interpret blueprints to determine the layout of cylinders, electrical connections and other system components
  • do preparatory construction work including steel work, wiring and piping
  • install doors and frames, guide rails, counterweights, and elevator, escalator and walkway chassis
  • connect car frames to counterweights with cables and assemble elevator cars
  • wire electronic control system equipment
  • test and adjust equipment
  • “trouble-shoot” when mechanical or electrical systems fail and make the necessary repairs
  • carry out preventative maintenance programs to ensure public safety

Most elevator constructors in Alberta belong to the International Union of Elevator Constructors. Elevator constructors are employed by elevator manufacturers and independent firms that contract to install, service and maintain elevator equipment. They are generally employed in cities where multi-storey buildings are common.

Skills & Abilities

To be successful in their trade, elevator constructors need:

  • mechanical aptitude
  • the ability to work well in a small crew without direct supervision
  • the ability to do detailed and precise work
  • a willingness to keep up to date with innovations in the field

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for an elevator constructor is 4 years (four 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1800 hours of on-the-job training each year. Technical training provided by the Canadian Elevator Industry Educational Program (CEIEP) is the only training presently recognized.

  • An applicant who previously completed courses of study or work experience related to the Elevator Constructor trade or holds a related journeyperson certificate and has the employer's recommendation, may qualify for credit that could reduce the term of apprenticeship.
  • A person who has previous training or work experience in the trade and wants to determine their level of skill and knowledge for entry or advanced standing in an apprenticeship program may complete the Prior Learning Assessment Online Application.
  • A high school student can become an apprentice and gain credits toward apprenticeship training and a high school diploma at the same time under the Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP).

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as an Elevator Constructor, contact the International Union of Elevator Constructors Local 130.

International Union of Elevator Constructors Local 130

International Union of Elevator Constructors Local 130 logo

Online

http://www.iueclocal130.ca

Location

Suite 202 4310 - 17th Ave. SE
Calgary, Alberta, T2A 0T4
403.243.1028
iuec130@telus.net

Floor Layer

What is a Floor Layer?

Floorcovering installers install, repair and replace floorcovering materials including underlayment, carpet, sheet goods (e.g., vinyl and linoleum) and tile in commercial, residential and industrial buildings.

Floorcovering installers may also install wall coverings made of carpet or vinyl.

Working from blueprints or verbal instructions, floorcovering installers:

  • inspect and prepare substrates for floorcovering
  • determine placement of any necessary seams or joints, and estimate the quantity of material required
  • measure and cut floorcovering materials to fit around permanent obstructions
  • install a foam or rubber pad over floors to be carpeted
  • sew carpet seams together or use special heat tape to join carpet pieces
  • stretch carpet and fasten it by means of a tackless strip around the perimeter of the room, or by gluing it to the floor
  • install sheet goods and resilient tile by applying adhesive to the substrate, laying the covering and rolling it with a roller
  • match and insert pieces of material in damaged areas
  • remove or replace baseboard moulding as required
  • install floorcovering materials on stairs
  • practice good customer relations

Floorcovering installers work indoors at various work sites. They typically work a 40-hour, five-day week, with some overtime required to meet construction deadlines. Night work may be required on some projects.

Skills & Abilities

The work is most rewarding for people who enjoy working with their hands, developing specialized skills and performing tasks with little direction or supervision.

To be successful in their trade, floorcovering installers need:

  • strength, stamina and the ability to use proper lifting techniques to lift awkward loads in excess of 25 kilograms
  • good colour vision to match colours and patterns
  • the ability to be polite and tactful with customers and get along with others

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for a floorcovering installer is 2 years (two 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1500 hours of on-the-job training and 7 weeks of technical training in the first year, and a minimum of 1500 hours of on-the-job training and 7 weeks of technical training in the second year.

  • An applicant who previously completed courses of study or work experience related to the Floorcovering Installer trade or holds a related journeyperson certificate and has the employer's recommendation, may qualify for credit that could reduce the term of apprenticeship.
  • A person who has previous training or work experience in the trade and wants to determine their level of skill and knowledge for entry or advanced standing in an apprenticeship program may complete the Prior Learning Assessment Online Application.
  • A high school student can become an apprentice and gain credits toward apprenticeship training and a high school diploma at the same time under the Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP).

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Floor Layer, contact the Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers Local 1325 or Local 2103.

The Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers Local 1325

Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers - Local 1325

Online

http://www.albertacarpenters.com

Location

15210 - 123 Ave NW
Edmonton, Alberta, T5V 0A3
Phone No. (780) 471-3200
Fax No. (780) 477-7143
Toll Free No. 1-800-272-7905

The Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers Local 2103

Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers Local 2103 logo

Online

http://www.albertacarpenters.com

Location

2626 23 Street NE
Calgary, Alberta
T2E 8L2
Phone No. (403) 283-0747
Fax No. (403) 283-6425

Glazier

What is a Glazier?

Glaziers cut and install glass and aluminum systems for commercial, residential and automotive applications.

In general, glaziers:

  • Read and interpret drawings and specifications to determine the materials required, location of framing and procedures for installation
  • Measure openings for size and shape, mark and cut glass panes to fit, secure the panes in place, weatherproof joints, and assemble and install aluminum window parts
  • Install, fit, fabricate and attach architectural metals or related substitute products in commercial and residential buildings
  • Assemble parts of pre-fabricated glass units such as revolving doors, display cases, plate glass, shower doors, store fronts, automatic doors, sky lights, sloped glazing, curtain walls, barrel vaults, solariums and other support structures
  • Install and maintain pre-fabricated glass, mirrors or glass products on walls, ceilings, fronts of buildings, handrails and walkways
  • Replace safety glass, windows, windshields, and glass in furniture and other products

Skills & Abilities

The work is most rewarding for those who enjoy variety, developing special skills and seeing the results of their work.

To be successful in their trade, glaziers need:

  • The skills to read, write and communicate verbally
  • Some mathematical ability
  • The physical strength and stamina required to work with heavy glass materials
  • The ability to work at heights
  • The ability to lift in excess of 25 kilograms
  • Good eyesight to measure, cut and see flaws in glass
  • Manual dexterity
  • The ability to work alone or with a team

Computer skills are an asset.

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for a glazier is 4 years (four 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1620 hours of on-the-job training and 6 weeks of technical training each year.

An applicant who previously completed courses of study or work experience related to the Glazier trade or holds a related journeyman certificate and has the employer’s recommendation, may qualify for credit that could reduce the term of apprenticeship.

A person who has previous training or work experience in the trade and wants to determine their level of skill and knowledge for entry or advanced standing in an apprenticeship program may apply for a Prior Learning Assessment.

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Glazier, contact the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades Local 177.


Heavy Equipment Technician

What is a Heavy Equipment Technician?

Heavy Equipment Technicians maintain, repair, and overhaul heavy vehicles and industrial equipment.

Maintenance and repair of vehicles and equipment may include:

  • internal combustion engines and components, both stationary and mobile
  • tracked equipment, commonly called crawler tractors
  • ground engaging equipment and components
  • earth moving equipment
  • rubber tired equipment, commonly called tractors
  • on-highway and off-highway motor vehicles, commonly called trucks
  • towed on-highway and off-highway vehicles, commonly called trailers

In general, heavy equipment technicians:

  • interpret work orders and technical manuals
  • keep equipment cleaned, lubricated and maintained
  • diagnose faults or malfunctions
  • adjust equipment and repair or replace defective parts, components or systems
  • test repaired equipment for proper performance and ensure that the work done meets manufacturers' specifications and legislated regulations
  • write service reports

Skills & Abilities

The work is most rewarding for those who enjoy achieving expertise with precise work, problem solving and working with their hands.

To be successful in the trade, heavy equipment technicians need:

  • good vision, hearing and sense of smell to diagnose problems
  • the strength and stamina required to work with heavy equipment and work in cramped or awkward positions
  • the ability to work alone or as part of a team
  • mechanical ability and an interest in all types of machinery and engines, electronics and precision equipment
  • the ability to think logically and keep up with changes in technology

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for a heavy equipment technician is 4 years (four 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1500 hours of on-the-job training and 8 weeks of technical training each year.

  • An applicant who previously completed courses of study or work experience related to the Heavy Equipment Technician trade or holds a related journeyperson certificate and has the employer's recommendation, may qualify for credit that could reduce the term of apprenticeship.
  • A person who has previous training or work experience in the trade and wants to determine their level of skill and knowledge for entry or advanced standing in an apprenticeship program may complete the Prior Learning Assessment Online Application. For more information.
  • A high school student can become an apprentice and gain credits toward apprenticeship training and a high school diploma at the same time under the Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP).

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Heavy Equipment Technician, contact the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 955.

The International Union of Operating Engineers Local 955

International Union of Operating Engineers Local 955 logo

Online

http://www.iuoe955.com

Location

Edmonton

Head Office
17603 - 114 Ave
Edmonton, Alberta T5S 2R9
Phone No. (780) 483-0955
Fax No. (780) 483-1998

Calgary

#201, 1212 - 31 Ave NE
Calgary, Alberta T2E 7S8
Phone No. (403) 250-3840
Fax No. (403) 250-3916

Fort McMurray

258 Gregoire Drive
Fort McMurray, Alberta T9H 4K6
Phone No.(780) 790-1713
Fax No.(780) 743-2582

Edson

#201, 4924-1st Avenue
Edson, Alberta T7E 1T69
Phone No. (780) 723-5955
Fax No. (780) 723-7540

Hotel Worker

UNITE HERE has a long history of working in hotels, with over 450,000 members across North America. Our members make hotels what they are! Without us they are just empty buildings. We cook, we clean, we are the face of the hotels.

UNITE HERE is growing on both sides of the boarder and we are working with our members to make hotel jobs good paying jobs that can support a family.

The service sector is the future of work and if we’re going to have good jobs in our community, hotel and service sector jobs have to have higher standards. That is why UNITE HERE Local 47 is working with our members in the hotel sector to get better collective agreements and organize more hotels.

US Senator John Edwards said in the New York Times, “Can we still really call America the land of opportunity when hotel workers who work full time for profitable hotel companies cannot afford to make ends meet?” Mr.Edwards said, “This is not just unjust. It is immoral, and we need to do something about it.”

All UNITE HERE Local 47 members become members of our union by being hired directly by the unionized hotels.

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Hotel Worker, contact UNITE-HERE Local 47.

UNITE-HERE Local 47

UNITE-HERE - Local 47 logo

Online

http://www.local47.net

Location

12836-146 Street
Edmonton, Alberta, T5L 2H7
Main office phone: 780-426-7890
FAX: 780-426-5098
Toll Free: 1-888-801-4373

Instrumentation Technician

What is an Instrumentation Technician

Instrument technicians install, maintain and repair the measuring and control instruments used in industrial and commercial processing. Instrument technicians work with a wide variety of pneumatic, electronic and microcomputer instruments used to measure and control variables such as pressure, flow, temperature, level, motion, force, and chemical composition.

In general, they:

  • Consult manufacturers’ manuals to determine test and maintenance procedures
  • Use pneumatic, electrical and electronic testing devices to inspect and test instrument and system operations, and diagnose faults
  • Consult with and advise process operators
  • Repair, maintain and adjust system components or remove and replace defective parts
  • Do risk assessments
  • Calibrate and maintain components and instruments according to manufacturers’ specifications
  • Work with engineers on basic design
  • Install and maintain instruments on new or existing plant equipment and processes.

Skills & Abilities

Instrumentation is most rewarding for those who enjoy security, problem solving, developing an area of expertise, and working with little direction or supervision.

To be successful in the trade, instrument technicians need:

  • The ability to pay careful attention to details
  • Good communication and reading skills,
  • Manual dexterity and patience
  • The ability to lift between 11 and 25 kilograms
  • Good mathematical, scientific, mechanical and logical reasoning abilities
  • The ability and desire to keep up-to-date with technological developments in the field

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for an instrument technician is 4 years (four 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1500 hours of on-the-job training and 8 weeks of technical training in the first and second year, and a minimum of 1425 hours of on-the-job training and 10 weeks of technical training in the third and fourth year.

An applicant who previously completed courses of study or work experience related to the Instrument Technician trade or holds a related journeyman certificate and has the employer's recommendation, may qualify for credit that could reduce the term of apprenticeship.

A person who has previous training or work experience in the trade and wants to determine their level of skill and knowledge for entry or advanced standing in an apprenticeship program may apply for a Prior Learning Assessment.

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as an Instrument Technician, contact the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 424 or the United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 496 or Local 488.

International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 424

International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers - Local 424 logo

Online

http://www.ibew424.net
Facebook
Twitter
YouTube

Location

Calgary

3623 - 29 St NE
Calgary, Alberta T1Y 5W4
Phone No. (403) 717-0322
Fax No. (403) 717-0326

Edmonton

4232 - 93 St
Edmonton, Alberta T6E 5P5
Phone No. (780) 462-5076
Fax No. (780) 450-0461

Fort McMurray

Suite 206
10020 Franklin Ave
Fort McMurray, Alberta T9H 2K6
Phone No. (780) 791-4727
Fax No. (780) 743-8501

United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 496

United Association of Journeymen & Apprentices of Plumbing & Pipefitting Industry of the United States & Canada Local 496 logo

Online

http://www.local496.ca

Location

5649 Burbank Road SE
Calgary Alberta, T2H 1Z5
Phone: 403 252-1166
Fax: 403 252-4591

United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 488

United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters - Local 488 logo

 Online

http://www.local488.ca

Contact

Calgary

#165, 6223-2 Street SE
Calgary Alberta, T2H 1J5
Phone: 403 253-3516
Fax: 403 253-3534

Edmonton

Pipe Trades Building
16214 118 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, T5V 1M6
Phone: 780 452-7080
Fax: 780 452-1291
info@local488.ca

Fort McMurray

9703A Franklin Avenue
Ft. McMurray AB T9H 1K3
Phone: 780 791-6488v Fax: 780 790-9393


Insulator

What is an Insulator?

Insulators apply, remove and repair thermal and acoustical insulation (e.g., calcium silicate, glass foam, mineral wool, styrofoam, fiberglass) on all types of industrial equipment (e.g., duct piping, heat exchangers, tanks, vessels).

In general, insulators:

  • Read and interpret drawings and specifications to determine insulation requirements
  • Select the amount and type of insulation to be installed as well as a method of securing the insulation (e.g., spraying, pin welding, wiring, pasting, strapping, taping) according to the type and shape of surface, whether or not the equipment is cold or hot, inside or outside, and what the equipment is going to be used for
  • Measure and cut insulating material and coverings to the required shape and dimension
  • Fit insulation around obstructions or shape insulation materials and protective coverings
  • Install vapour barriers and finish insulated surfaces by applying metal cladding, canvas, plastic sheeting or cement

Skills & Abilities

Insulating is most rewarding for those who enjoy doing tasks precisely. It is also an occupation for people who prefer stability and security.

To be successful in their trade, insulators need:

  • Manual dexterity
  • The ability to lift up to 25 kilograms
  • The agility required to work in cramped spaces
  • The ability to work at heights and in hot and cold environments

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for an insulator is 3 years (three 12-month periods). This consists of a minimum of 1517 hours of on-the-job training and 7 weeks of technical training in the first, second and third year of apprenticeship, for a total of 4551 hours.

An applicant who previously completed courses of study or work experience related to the Insulator trade or holds a related journeyman certificate and has the employer’s recommendation, may qualify for credit that could reduce the term of apprenticeship.

A person who has previous training or work experience in the trade and wants to determine their level of skill and knowledge for entry or advanced standing in an apprenticeship program may apply for a Prior Learning Assessment.

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as an Insulator, contact the International Association of Heat and Frost Insulators Local 110.

International Association of Heat and Frost Insulators Local 110

International Association of Heat and Frost Insulators - Local 110 logo

Online

http://insulators110.com/

Location

Edmonton

9335 47 Street NW
Edmonton Alberta, T6B 2R7
Phone: (780) 426-2874

Calgary

#201D, 3804 MacLeod Trail S.E.
Calgary, Alberta
Phone: (403) 243-1234

Ironworker, Reinforcing

What is a Reinforcing Ironworker?

Ironworker - Reinforcing tradespeople place and tie reinforcing material. They place and tie reinforcing steel, and post-tension tendons and related components to reinforce concrete structures.

In general, Ironworker - Reinforcing tradespeople:

  • Read blueprints and specifications to lay out the work
  • Unload materials so each piece can be accessed, re-located and/or hoisted as needed
  • Erect and install construction cranes and other hoisting equipment
  • Assemble rigging (cables, pulleys, hooks) to move materials
  • Attach cables from a crane or derrick and direct crane operators with hand signals or radios
  • Select, cut, bend, position, and secure steel bars or wire mesh in concrete forms to reinforce the concrete
  • Perform post-tensioning

Skills & Abilities

Successful Ironworker - Reinforcing tradespeople enjoy developing their expertise by doing precise work in a broad range of industries and locations. They enjoy the outdoors and often like traveling and working with different crews.

To be successful in their trade, Ironworker - Reinforcing tradespeople need:

  • The ability to interpret blueprints/placing drawings and other specification documentation
  • An understanding of safe work practices and the knowledge to safely operate the tools and equipment of the trade
  • To be able to work at heights
  • The ability to lift in excess of 25 kilograms
  • Very good muscular coordination, agility and balance
  • A willingness to travel to various work sites
  • An inclination to work cooperatively with others
  • The ability to act quickly and decisively in emergencies

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for an Ironworker - Reinforcing tradesperson is 2 years (two 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1500 hours of on-the-job training and 6 weeks of technical training for each period.

Minimum requirements are, a pass mark in:

English 10-2 and Math 10-3
Or
All five Canadian General Educational Development (GED) tests
Or
Entrance Exam

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Reinforcing Ironworker, contact the International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental & Reinforcing Iron Workers Local 720 or Local 725.

International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental & Reinforcing Iron Workers Local 720

International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Iron Workers Local 720 logo

Online

http://www.ironworkers720.com

Location

10512 - 122 St NW
Edmonton, Alberta T5N 1M6
Phone No. (780) 482-0720
Fax No. (780) 482-0874

International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental & Reinforcing Ironworkers Local 725

International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Ironworkers - Local 725 logo

Online

http://ironworkers725.com
Facebook

Location

6111 - 36 Street, S.E.
Calgary, Alberta T2C 3W2
Phone No. (403) 291-1300
Fax No. (403) 291-2243

Ironworker, Structural or Ornamental

What is a Structural / Ornamental Ironworker?

Ironworker - Structural/Ornamental tradespeople fabricate and construct structural steel buildings, bridges, pre-cast structures, ornamental ironwork and join scaffolding.

They erect structural steel and pre-cast components, install conveyors and other equipment, install miscellaneous and secondary steel, curtain wall and sometimes perform reconstructive work on existing structures.

In general, Ironworker - Structural/Ornamental tradespeople:

  • Read blueprints and specifications to lay out the work
  • Unload and stack steel units so each piece can be hoisted as needed
  • Erect and install scaffolding, construction cranes, derricks and other hoisting equipment
  • Assemble rigging (cables, pulleys, hooks) to move heavy equipment and other materials
  • Attach cables from a crane or derrick and direct crane operators with hand signals or radios
  • Position steel units, align holes and insert temporary and permanent bolts
  • Check the alignments and join steel parts by bolting or tack welding them with electric arc processes
  • Assemble and erect pre-fabricated metal structures and related components
  • Install ornamental/architectural and other structural metalwork such as curtain walls, metal stairways, railings and power doors
  • Unload and install pre-cast structural and architectural components

Skills & Abilities

Successful Ironworker - Structural/Ornamental tradespeople enjoy developing their expertise by doing precise work in a broad range of industries and locations. They enjoy the outdoors and often like travelling and working with different crews.

To be successful in their trade, Ironworker - Structural/Ornamental tradespeople need:

  • The ability to interpret blueprints
  • An understanding of safe work practices and the knowledge to safely operate the tools and equipment of the trade
  • To be able to work at heights
  • The ability to lift in excess of 25 kilograms
  • Very good muscular coordination, agility and balance
  • A willingness to travel to various work sites
  • An inclination to work cooperatively with others the ability to act quickly and decisively in emergencies

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for an Ironworker - Structural/ornamental tradesperson is 3 years (three 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1500 hours of on-the-job training and 6 weeks of technical training each period.

Minimum requirements are, a pass mark in:

English 10-2 and Math 10-3
Or
All five Canadian General Educational Development (GED) tests
Or
Entrance Exam

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Structural or Ornamental Ironworker, contact the International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental & Reinforcing Iron Workers Local 720 or Local 725.

International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental & Reinforcing Iron Workers Local 720

International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Iron Workers Local 720 logo

Online

http://www.ironworkers720.com

Location

10512 - 122 St NW
Edmonton, Alberta T5N 1M6
Phone No. (780) 482-0720
Fax No. (780) 482-0874

International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental & Reinforcing Ironworkers Local 725

International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Ironworkers - Local 725 logo

Online

http://ironworkers725.com
Facebook

Location

6111 - 36 Street, S.E.
Calgary, Alberta T2C 3W2
Phone No. (403) 291-1300
Fax No. (403) 291-2243

ISM Mechanic

What is a

Lather - Interior Systems Mechanics install a wide variety of wall and ceiling systems and exterior finishes, bringing various buildings to a completed state.

On a typical job, lather – interior systems mechanics (lathers):

  • read blueprints and work as a team with architects, engineers and associated trades to bring a project to completion;
  • install metal framing for walls, partitions, ceiling systems and ornamental detail;
  • apply base materials for stucco finishes including Styrofoam, stucco wire and metal lath, and apply various stucco finishes;
  • work with other trades to accommodate the installation of heating, plumbing, electrical and millwork;
  • install metal doors, window frames, access doors and insulation;
  • erect demountable partitions and various suspended ceilings as used in commercial office space;
  • install and finish drywall on commercial, residential and industrial projects; and
  • install load-bearing steel wall and floor systems used in the construction of non-combustible buildings.

Skills & Abilities

The type of work is very rewarding for those who:

  • enjoy using skills that require a high degree of accuracy;
  • are capable of problem solving and creative thinking; and
  • enjoy working at a variety of tasks.

To be successful in their trade, Lathers need:

  • good hand-eye coordination;
  • to be physically fit;
  • strength, stamina and the use of proper lifting techniques required to work with heavy equipment weighing in excess of 25 kilograms (55 pounds);
  • the ability and willingness to pay careful attention to detail; and
  • the ability to work well with others, and independently.

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for a Lather - Interior Systems Mechanic is 3 years (three 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1560 hours of on-the-job training and 8 weeks of technical training in each of the first, second, and third years.

  • An applicant who previously completed courses of study or work experience related to the Lather trade or holds a related journeyperson certificate and has the employer's recommendation, may qualify for credit that could reduce the term of apprenticeship. Inquiries about credit for previously completed courses of study or work experience can be directed to an apprentice representative at any Apprenticeship and Industry Training Office.
  • A person who has previous training or work experience in the trade and wants to determine their level of skill and knowledge for entry or advanced standing in an apprenticeship program may complete the Prior Learning Assessment Online Application. For more information, see the Prior Learning Assessment Guide.
  • A high school student can become an apprentice and gain credits toward apprenticeship training and a high school diploma at the same time under the Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP).

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as an ISM Mechanic, contact the Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers Local 1325 or Local 2103.

The Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers Local 1325

Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers - Local 1325

Online

http://www.albertacarpenters.com

Location

15210 - 123 Ave NW
Edmonton, Alberta, T5V 0A3
Phone No. (780) 471-3200
Fax No. (780) 477-7143
Toll Free No. 1-800-272-7905

The Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers Local 2103

Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers Local 2103 logo

Online

http://www.albertacarpenters.com

Location

2626 23 Street NE
Calgary, Alberta
T2E 8L2
Phone No. (403) 283-0747
Fax No. (403) 283-6425

Labourer

What is a Labourer?

Construction Craft Labourers prepare and clean up construction sites, move materials and equipment, perform demolition, excavation and compaction activities.

Duties and responsibilities vary from one job to another but, in general, Construction Craft Labourers:

  • Handle and distribute construction materials (e.g., load and unload vehicles with supplies, equipment and construction materials; shipping and receiving, computer inventory and distribution of tools (tool crib), equipment and construction materials to and from work areas; remove rubble and other debris)
  • Excavate, backfill and compact sub grade (e.g., move and level earth using shovels and rakes; operate small compaction equipment and pneumatic tampers)
  • Place, consolidate and protect case-in-place concrete or masonry structures (e.g., concrete placement through forms such as pumping, buckets or shoots, vibrating means such as electrical or pneumatic vibrators, mixing of concrete products for pump basis and other concrete applications)
  • Install municipal sewer and water mains (e.g., dig trenches using shovels and other hand tools; align pipes and perform related activities)
  • Assemble and dismantle scaffolding, ramps, catwalks, shoring and barricades at construction sites
  • Drill and blast rock at construction sites
  • Demolish buildings
  • Sort, clean and pile salvaged materials from demolished buildings
  • Operate jackhammers and drills to break up concrete or pavement
  • Site Services
  • Masonry Structures (e.g., scaffold erection, mixing materials, vapor barrier applications, handling masonry materials and fork lift/zoom boom operations)
  • Surveying (e.g. assisting with duties of the surveyor)
  • Safety Monitoring (e.g. flagging, gas detection, confined space monitor, spark watch, bottle watch)
  • Pipeline Labour
  • Refractory Labour (e.g. mixing, conveying and removal of vessel heat retardant materials)
  • Plant Maintenance
  • Rail Operations and Construction
  • Pipe Coating Protection Manufacturing
  • Directional Drilling (e.g. tending to directional drills)
  • Utilities Services
  • EMR and NCSO Services
  • Bridge Construction
  • Sidewalk, curb & gutter and road building

Skills & Abilities

The labourer trade appeals to people who enjoy being physically active, working outdoors, and using hand and power tools.

To be successful in the occupation, Construction Craft Labourers need:

  • Physical strength and stamina
  • Manual dexterity
  • The ability to lift more than 25 kilograms
  • A safety conscious attitude
  • The ability to work with others in a team

Apprenticeship Training

The term of training for a Construction Craft Labourer is a minimum of 12 months including at least 2,000 hours of work experience. An applicant who previously completed training or work experience related to the Construction Craft Labourer occupation or who holds a related certificate may qualify for credit that could reduce the term of training.

To learn the skills required of a Construction Craft Labourer and be issued an Alberta Occupational Certificate, a person must:

  • Have at least Alberta Grade 9 education or equivalent, or pass the entrance exam.
  • Find a suitable employer who is willing to hire a trainee.

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Labourer, contact the Construction & General Workers Local 92 or the Construction & Specialized Workers Union Local 1111.

Construction & General Workers Local 92

Construction and General Workers' Union Local 92 logo

Online

http://www.local92.com
Facebook

Location

10319 - 106 Avenue
Edmonton, Alberta, T5H 0P4
Phone: 780-426-6630
Toll-Free: 1-800-661-1989
Fax: 780-426-6639
Email: mail@local92.com

Construction & Specialized Workers Union Local 1111

Construction & Specialized Workers Union - Local 1111 logo

Online

http://www.local1111.org
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
YouTube
LinkedIn

Location

4715 1st Street SW
Calgary, Alberta, T2G 0A1
Phone. (403) 287-2090
Toll Free. 1-800-322-8183

Millwright

What is a Millwright?

Millwrights install, maintain, repair and troubleshoot stationary industrial machinery and mechanical equipment in factories, production plants and recreational facilities.

On a typical job, Millwrights:

  • Read diagrams and schematic drawings to determine work procedures
  • Operate rig equipment and dollies to move and place heavy machinery and parts
  • Install, level and align large stationary compressors, gas turbines, steam turbines and other large industrial machinery
  • Align and test equipment, and make any necessary adjustments
  • Perform preventive and operational maintenance using procedures such as vibration analysis
  • Repair or replace defective parts when necessary
  • Trouble-shoot hydraulic, pneumatic and programmable logic controls
  • May do some welding and fabrication as well as maintain an inventory of replacement parts

Skills & Abilities

This trade is most rewarding for those who enjoy variety, security and doing precision work with machinery and equipment.

Success in Millwrighting requires:

  • The strength and stamina required to work with heavy equipment weighing more than 25 kilograms
  • Good coordination and manual dexterity
  • The ability to visualize a layout by looking at plans and blueprints
  • The ability to comprehend and trouble-shoot mechanical systems
  • The ability to get along with, and sometimes supervise, others

Apprenticeship Training

A millwright apprenticeship term is 4 years (four 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1560 hours of on-the-job training and 8 weeks of technical training each year.

An applicant who has previously completed courses of study, or who has work experience related to the millwright trade, or who holds a related journeyman certificate and has the employer’s recommendation, may qualify for credit that can reduce the term of apprenticeship.

A person who has previous training or work experience in the trade and wants to determine their level of skill and knowledge for entry or advanced standing in an apprenticeship program may apply for a Prior Learning Assessment.

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Millwright, contact the Millwrights, Machinery Erectors and Maintenance Union (Alberta Regional Council) Local 1460.

Millwrights, Machinery Erectors and Maintenance Union (Alberta Regional Council) Local 1460

Millwrights, Machinery Erectors and Maintenance Union (Alberta Regional Council) - Local 1460 logo

Online

http://www.workunion.ca/L1460/index.html

Location

Suite 177, 15210 123 Avenue
Edmonton, Alberta, T5V 0A3
Phone: 780.430.1460 ext. 2164
Fax: (780) 474-8580

Mobile Crane Operator

What is a Mobile Crane Operator

Crane and hoisting equipment operators service and operate the hoist and swing equipment used to move machinery, materials and other large objects.Mobile crane operatorsservice and operate booms that are mounted on crawlers or wheeled frames as well as traveling, fixed or climbing type hoisting equipment with a vertical mast or tower and a jib.

Operators manipulate a number of pedals and levers to rotate the crane, and raise and lower its boom and one or more loadlines. Some or all of these operations may be performed simultaneously.

Certification is required when operating mobile cranes with a lifting capacity of fifteen tons (13.6 tonnes) and over. Mobile crane operators also may drive the crane to the job site, rig the machine up (pin the boom and pendant cables and pull the hoist cable in preparation for operation), and set up the machine for the lift (i.e., make it level and stable) using blocking and leveling materials.

Crane and hoisting equipment operators – mobile crane (mobile crane operators) work outdoors, often in noisy, dusty conditions. They work in various locations throughout Alberta, in all types of weather. A 40-hour, five-day week is normal, but overtime may be required to meet construction deadlines.

Occupational hazards include injuries resulting from power line contact, crane overload, falls, weather conditions or manual lifting.

Skills & Abilities

Successful operators are capable decision-makers prepared to work independently when necessary. Yet they also enjoy the comradery of being part of a team and traveling to different locations. They often like variety in their work.

To be successful in the trade, mobile crane operators need:

  • coordination and manual dexterity
  • the ability to work at heights
  • the strength, stamina, and ability to use proper lifting techniques to lift items weighing in excess of 25 kilograms
  • good vision
  • the ability to work as part of a team and communicate with ground crews, usually using hand signals and voice communication

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for a mobile crane operator is 3 years (three 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1500 hours of on-the-job training and 4 or 6 weeks of technical training* (subject to the training institute) in the first year, a minimum of 1500 hours of on-the-job training in the second year, and 1500 hours of on-the-job training and 5 or 6 weeks of technical training** in the third year.

* NAIT uniquely offers the shorter 4 week 1st period training program but requires 60 hours of self-study prior to commencing technical training.
* NAIT uniquely offers the shorter 5 week 3rd period training program but requires 30 hours of self-study prior to commencing technical training.

  • An applicant who previously completed courses of study or work experience related to the Mobile Crane Operator trade or holds a related journeyperson certificate and has the employer's recommendation, may qualify for credit that could reduce the term of apprenticeship. Inquiries about credit for previously completed courses of study or work experience can be directed to an apprentice representative at any Apprenticeship and Industry Training Office.
  • A person who has previous training or work experience in the trade and wants to determine their level of skill and knowledge for entry or advanced standing in an apprenticeship program may complete the Prior Learning Assessment Online Application. For more information, see the Prior Learning Assessment Guide.
  • A high school student can become an apprentice and gain credits toward apprenticeship training and a high school diploma at the same time under the Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP).

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Mobile Crane Operator, contact the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 955.

The International Union of Operating Engineers Local 955

International Union of Operating Engineers Local 955 logo

Online

http://www.iuoe955.com

Location

Edmonton

Head Office
17603 - 114 Ave
Edmonton, Alberta T5S 2R9
Phone No. (780) 483-0955
Fax No. (780) 483-1998

Calgary

#201, 1212 - 31 Ave NE
Calgary, Alberta T2E 7S8
Phone No. (403) 250-3840
Fax No. (403) 250-3916

Fort McMurray

258 Gregoire Drive
Fort McMurray, Alberta T9H 4K6
Phone No.(780) 790-1713
Fax No.(780) 743-2582

Edson

#201, 4924-1st Avenue
Edson, Alberta T7E 1T69
Phone No. (780) 723-5955
Fax No. (780) 723-7540

Operating Engineer

What is an Operating Engineer?

The International Union of Operating Engineers Local Union No. 955 represents over 12,000 skilled workers in the province of Alberta and the Northwest Territories.

Operating Engineers are the men and women that work in general construction, pipeline, road building, mining, transportation, fabrication shops, equipment rental shops, mechanical repair shops, food and beverage plants, manufacturing plants, healthcare facilities, school divisions, county workers and government sectors.

Operating Engineer members work as light and heavy equipment operators, mechanics, welders, crane operators, steam engineers, surveyors, clerical, management, custodians, healthcare workers, manufacturing and other plant workers.

Skills & Abilities

Apprenticeship Training

The International Union of Operating Engineers represents people in two categories of work. One is hoisting and portable, the other is stationary.

Hoisting and portable represents the people involved in the construction industry, mining, roadbuilding, fabrication shops, transportation, equipment rental shops, and mechanical repair shops. Members in this category often are certified trades people in the trades of Heavy Equipment Technician (four year apprenticeship), Automotive Service Technician (four year apprenticeship), Mobile Crane Operator (three year apprenticeship), Tower Crane Operator (two year apprenticeship), Boom Truck Operator (one year apprenticeship), and Welder (three year apprenticeship).

Also represented are Industrial Surveyors and Surveyor Assistants which work with engineers in the planning and layout of new and existing construction sites, including buildings and grade levels. A keen mathematical ability is forefront in a trade like this. You can get your training along the way as you work. There is a two year full time program in surveying that can be done at technical training institutes.

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as an Operating Engineer, contact the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 955.

The International Union of Operating Engineers Local 955

International Union of Operating Engineers Local 955 logo

Online

http://www.iuoe955.com

Location

Edmonton

Head Office
17603 - 114 Ave
Edmonton, Alberta T5S 2R9
Phone No. (780) 483-0955
Fax No. (780) 483-1998

Calgary

#201, 1212 - 31 Ave NE
Calgary, Alberta T2E 7S8
Phone No. (403) 250-3840
Fax No. (403) 250-3916

Fort McMurray

258 Gregoire Drive
Fort McMurray, Alberta T9H 4K6
Phone No.(780) 790-1713
Fax No.(780) 743-2582

Edson

#201, 4924-1st Avenue
Edson, Alberta T7E 1T69
Phone No. (780) 723-5955
Fax No. (780) 723-7540

Painter

What is a Painter?

Painters apply paint, wall coverings and other finishes to interior and exterior surfaces of buildings and other structures.

In general, painters:

  • Estimate the quantity of materials required by measuring surfaces or reviewing a work order
  • Remove the old coating by stripping it with solvents, heat, sanding, wire brushing, or water and sand blasting
  • Prepare the surface for covering by cleaning it, filling nail holes and cracks, and sanding rough spots
  • Apply an undercoat primer or sealer before painting
  • Match specified colours by using premixed paints, or mixing colour, pigment, oil, thinning and drying additives
  • Use brushes, rollers or spray guns to apply liquid coatings such as paint, stain or varnish to surfaces of wood, metal, brick, concrete, plaster, stucco or stone
  • Sandblast and apply industrial coatings
  • Apply faux finishes
  • Apply paper, or natural and synthetic fabric wall coverings, fire-proof and fire-retardant coating

Skills & Abilities

People who enjoy working in this trade tend to prefer work that involves variety, creativity, and recognition for their skills.

To be successful in the trade painters need:

  • Good colour sense
  • Manual dexterity
  • The ability to lift up to 25 kilograms
  • The ability to work at heights
  • The strength required to move heavy ladders or set up scaffolding
  • A desire to do a precise and thorough job

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for a painter is 3 years (three 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1300 hours of on-the-job training and 8 weeks of technical training each year.

An applicant who previously completed courses of study or work experience related to the Painting trade or holds a related journeyman certificate and has the employer’s recommendation, may qualify for credit that could reduce the term of apprenticeship.

A person who has previous training or work experience in the trade and wants to determine their level of skill and knowledge for entry or advanced standing in an apprenticeship program may apply for a Prior Learning Assessment.

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Painter, contact the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades District Council 17.

Plasterer - Fireproofer

What is a Plasterer – Fireproofer?

Plasterers select, mix and apply gypsum, cement and acrylic mixtures to exterior and interior walls and ceilings to produce clean finishes or decorative surfaces that are fire, weather or sound resistant.

Duties vary according to the type of the job.

In residential jobs, plasterers apply a coat(s) of plaster material over interior or exterior masonry surfaces, especially manufactured wallboard and drywall surfaces which include plaster, stucco or acrylic.

  • Exterior applications such as stucco, acrylic
  • Interior applications include spraying textures or handtrowelling ornamental or decorative finishes.

In industrial and commercial jobs, plasterers spray specialized coatings for sound control and hand-trowel or spray fireproofing material for fire protection. Fireproofing is an essential building component in high-rise office buildings and anywhere the integrity of a structure could be compromised by the heat generated during a fire.

Industries that require fireproofing and sound coats include: Refineries, Petro-Chemical, Nuclear Power Plants, Conventional Power Plants, Chemical Processing, Pulp and Paper Mills, Biomedical, Pharmaceutical Facilities, Factories, Warehouses and Institutions.

Skills and Abilities

The work is most rewarding for those who take pride in creating and following application procedures to produce a variety for first-class plastering finishes.

To be successful in the trade, plasterers:

  • Require a great deal of physical stamina
  • Work involves standing, crouching and kneeling for long periods of time, lifting, bending, reaching and climbing ladders.
  • Able to work at heights on scaffolding
  • Manual dexterity
  • Ability to lift 60-80 pounds
  • Able to work with others
  • Have positive attitudes and behaviors
  • Minimum of grade 10 education
  • Willing to work out of town

Apprenticeship Training

The term of an Apprentice Plasterer is 4 years (12 month periods) including a minimum of 5000 hours on-the-job training and 8 weeks of technical training.

A person who has previous training or work experience in a related trade or holds a journeyman certificate and has completed the proof of hours form, may qualify for a credit that may reduce the term of apprenticeship.

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Plasterer - Fireproofer, contact the Operative Plasterers and Cement Masons International Local 222.

Operative Plasterers and Cement Masons International Local 222

Operative Plasterers and Cement Masons International - Local 222 logo

Online

http://www.local222.com

Location

Edmonton

#42, 4004 – 97 Street NW
Edmonton, Alberta, T6E 6N1
Phone: (780) 423-4296
Fax: (780) 423-4271
Email: www.local222.com

Calgary

Phone: (403) 258-0042

Plumber

What is a Plumber?

On a typical construction job, plumbers do the “roughing in” after the frame and roof of a new building are in place.

In other words, they:

  • Study the building plans and specifications to determine the layout for the plumbing and other materials
  • Locate and mark the positions for connections and fixtures
  • Cut holes through walls and floors to accommodate pipes
  • Select the type and size of pipe required and measure, cut, thread, bend, clamp, solvent cement or solder pipe
  • Assemble and install valves and fittings
  • Join pipe sections and secure them in position
  • Test pipe systems for leaks
  • Install underground storm, sanitary and water piping systems

Skills & Abilities

The plumbing trade is most rewarding to people who enjoy using their specialized skills in a variety of working conditions and working with little supervision.

To be successful in the trade, plumbers need:

  • The physical stamina required to:
    • Lift heavy pipes weighing in excess of 25 kilograms
    • Be on your feet for long periods
    • Sometimes work in cramped positions
  • Mechanical ability
  • The ability to work alone or with others

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for a plumber is 4 years (four 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1500 hours of on-the-job training and 8 weeks of technical training each year.

An applicant who is not already certified in Alberta as a gasfitter (1st Class or 2nd Class) will complete an apprenticeship program that includes both the plumber and gasfitter 2nd class trades.

An applicant who previously completed courses of study or work experience related to the plumber trade or holds a related journeyman certificate and has the employer’s recommendation, may qualify for credit that could reduce the term of apprenticeship.

A person who has previous training or work experience in the trade and wants to determine their level of skill and knowledge for entry or advanced standing in an apprenticeship program may apply for a Prior Learning Assessment.

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Plumber, contact the United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 488 or Local 496.

United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 488

United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters - Local 488 logo

 Online

http://www.local488.ca

Contact

Calgary

#165, 6223-2 Street SE
Calgary Alberta, T2H 1J5
Phone: 403 253-3516
Fax: 403 253-3534

Edmonton

Pipe Trades Building
16214 118 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, T5V 1M6
Phone: 780 452-7080
Fax: 780 452-1291
info@local488.ca

Fort McMurray

9703A Franklin Avenue
Ft. McMurray AB T9H 1K3
Phone: 780 791-6488v Fax: 780 790-9393


United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 496

United Association of Journeymen & Apprentices of Plumbing & Pipefitting Industry of the United States & Canada Local 496 logo

Online

http://www.local496.ca

Location

5649 Burbank Road SE
Calgary Alberta, T2H 1Z5
Phone: 403 252-1166
Fax: 403 252-4591

Roofer

What is a

Roofers prepare and apply protective coverings to flat and sloped roof surfaces in accordance with construction plans and specifications.

Most flat roofs can be covered by a variety of substances and systems such as:

  • conventional roof system (hot applied asphalt);
  • elastomeric roof membrane system (rubber-like properties);
  • thermo plastic roof membrane system; and
  • modified bitumen roof membrane system (asphalt and plastic).

On the flat roofs of commercial and industrial buildings under construction, roofers:

  • put a layer of vapour/air barrier and/or a layer of insulation on the roof deck;
  • spread hot bitumen (a tar-like substance) over and under layers of roofing felt (fabric soaked in bitumen), or apply single-ply membranes of waterproof rubber or thermoplastic compounds to make the surface watertight; and
  • install metal or membrane flashing (strips) to protect the edges of the roofing materials.

Most sloped residential roofs are covered with shingles made of asphalt, fibreglass, tile, slate, wood shakes or metal. Roofers working on sloped roofs:

  • apply membranes, fibreglass or felt over parts of the surface before applying shingles;
  • nail shingles in overlapping rows;
  • cement or nail flashing over the joints around vent pipes or chimneys; and
  • cover exposed nailheads with cement to prevent rust and water leakage.

Roofers may also:

  • inspect problem roofs to determine the best procedures for repairing them;
  • estimate materials required and quote costs;
  • repair older roofs;
  • waterproof roofs, basements, foundations, plaza decks or parkades;
  • install green/vegetated roof components; and
  • incorporate new future roofing technology (i.e. conventional and non-conventional solar roofing technology).

Roofers work outdoors on roofs of varying heights. When the weather is good and building activity is high, roofers may work considerable overtime.

There can be a risk of injury from falls and from working with hazardous, hot materials.

Skills & Abilities

The work is most rewarding for those who enjoy physical exercise, working with their hands, developing special skills and the security of steady employment.

To be successful in their trade, roofers need to be:

  • in good physical condition;
  • sure-footed and able to work at heights;
  • strength, stamina and the use of proper lifting techniques to lift items in excess of 25 kilograms;
  • partial to working outdoors; and
  • able to get along well with co-workers.

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for a roofer is 4 years (four 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1420 hours of on-the-job training and 6 weeks of technical training in each of the first three years, and a minimum of 1600 hours of on-the-job training in the fourth year.

  • There are no specified entrance requirements for this trade.
  • An applicant who previously completed courses of study or work experience related to the Roofer trade or holds a related journeyperson certificate and has the employer's recommendation, may qualify for credit that could reduce the term of apprenticeship. Inquiries about credit for previously completed courses of study or work experience can be directed to an apprentice representative at any Apprenticeship and Industry Training Office.
  • A person who has previous training or work experience in the trade and wants to determine their level of skill and knowledge for entry or advanced standing in an apprenticeship program may complete the Prior Learning Assessment Online Application. For more information, see the Prior Learning Assessment Guide.
  • A high school student can become an apprentice and gain credits toward apprenticeship training and a high school diploma at the same time under the Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP).

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Roofer, contact the Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers Local 1325 or Local 2103.

The Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers Local 1325

Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers - Local 1325

Online

http://www.albertacarpenters.com

Location

15210 - 123 Ave NW
Edmonton, Alberta, T5V 0A3
Phone No. (780) 471-3200
Fax No. (780) 477-7143
Toll Free No. 1-800-272-7905

The Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers Local 2103

Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers Local 2103 logo

Online

http://www.albertacarpenters.com

Location

2626 23 Street NE
Calgary, Alberta
T2E 8L2
Phone No. (403) 283-0747
Fax No. (403) 283-6425

Sheet Metal Worker

What is a Sheet Metal Worker?

In general, sheet metal workers:

  • Lay out, measure and mark dimensions and reference lines on sheet metal according to drawings or templates
  • Supply, install, service and repair air handling equipment, furnaces, fans and air terminal devices
  • Use laser or plasma cutting equipment, numerically-controlled or computerized equipment, hand and power shears, snips and light metal-working equipment to cut, drill, punch, or bend and shape sheet metal
  • Fasten with bolts, screws, cement, rivets, adhesives, solder or by welding
  • Install and repair sheet metal products and ensure installations conform to specifications and building codes
  • Do metal cladding of insulated piping and equipment on industrial sites
  • Manufacture and install flashing, coping for roofing applications

Skills & Abilities

Sheet Metal work is most rewarding for people who enjoy developing special skills and putting them to use in a variety of ways.

To be successful, sheet metal workers need:

  • To be in good physical condition
  • A mechanical aptitude
  • The ability to lift in excess of 25 kilograms
  • Eye-hand coordination, spatial and form perception, good eyesight and manual dexterity
  • The ability to visualize a finished product from a drawing
  • A good background in practical mathematics, geometry and blueprint reading
  • The ability to stand for long periods, do some moderately heavy lifting and carrying, and work in high, awkward and noisy places
  • Patience, dependability and accuracy

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for a sheet metal worker is 4 years (four 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1425 hours of on-the-job training and 10 weeks of technical training each year.

An applicant who previously completed courses of study or work experience related to the Sheet Metal Worker trade or holds a related journeyman certificate and has the employer’s recommendation, may qualify for credit that could reduce the term of apprenticeship.

A person who has previous training or work experience in the trade and wants to determine their level of skill and knowledge for entry or advanced standing in an apprenticeship program may apply for a Prior Learning Assessment.

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Sheet Metal Worker, contact the Sheet Metal Workers International Local 8.

Sheet Metal Workers International Local 8

Sheet Metal Workers International - Local 8 logo

Online

http://www.local8.ca
Facebook
YouTube

Location

Calgary

#125, 5723 10 Street NE
Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8W7
Phone: (403) 250-1060 or cell (403) 813-5523
Fax: (403) 250-1061

Edmonton

17310 - 106 Avenue NW
Edmonton, Alberta, T5S 1H9
Phone: (780) 426-3375
Toll-free (in Alberta) 1-800-262-9083
Fax: (780) 426-1694


Steamfitter - Pipefitter

What is a Steamfitter - Pipefitter?

Pipefitters lay out, assemble, fabricate, maintain and repair piping systems, which carry water, steam, chemicals or fuel used in heating, cooling, lubricating and other processes.

To install a typical piping system in a commercial building or industrial plant, pipefitters:

  • Study blueprints, drawings and specifications to determine the type of pipe and tools to use, and lay out the sequence of tasks
  • Sometimes make detailed sketches for pipe and equipment fabrication and installation, as required
  • Measure, cut, thread, groove, bend, assemble and install metal, plastic and fiberglass pipes, valves and fittings
  • Join pipe sections, related equipment and secure in position
  • Use testing equipment to check systems for leaks

Pipefitters also remove and replace worn components, do general maintenance work and may work on plant shut-downs.

Skills & Abilities

The work is most rewarding for those who enjoy working with little direction or supervision.

To be successful in their trade, pipefitters need:

  • The physical strength and stamina required to lift heavy materials and stand for long periods
  • Manual dexterity
  • Mechanical aptitude
  • The ability to read and understand complex instructions
  • The ability to do careful and exacting work

Apprenticeship Training

This is a good time to be looking for a career in the skilled trades. The Conference Board of Canada estimates there will be a shortage of one million workers in the trades and related occupations within twenty years. Employers in many industries and regions raise concerns about shortages of skilled workers in the trades. The “Baby Boomer” generation is going to retire soon and needs to be replaced.

The term of apprenticeship for a steamfitter - pipefitter is 3 years (three 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1500 hours of on-the-job training and 8 weeks of technical training each year.

A high school student can become an apprentice and gain credits toward apprenticeship training and a high school diploma at the same time under the Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP).

To learn the skills required of a steamfitter - pipefitter in Alberta and be issued an Alberta Journeyman Certificate, a person must have a pass mark in:

  • English 20-2 - Math 20-3 - Science 10, or
  • All five Canadian General Educational Development (GED) tests, or
  • Entrance Exam

The United Association has over 100 years of providing additional training, producing the highest skilled tradesmen in the industry.

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Steamfitter - Pipefitter, contact the United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 488 or Local 496.

United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 488

United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters - Local 488 logo

 Online

http://www.local488.ca

Contact

Calgary

#165, 6223-2 Street SE
Calgary Alberta, T2H 1J5
Phone: 403 253-3516
Fax: 403 253-3534

Edmonton

Pipe Trades Building
16214 118 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, T5V 1M6
Phone: 780 452-7080
Fax: 780 452-1291
info@local488.ca

Fort McMurray

9703A Franklin Avenue
Ft. McMurray AB T9H 1K3
Phone: 780 791-6488v Fax: 780 790-9393


United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 496

United Association of Journeymen & Apprentices of Plumbing & Pipefitting Industry of the United States & Canada Local 496 logo

Online

http://www.local496.ca

Location

5649 Burbank Road SE
Calgary Alberta, T2H 1Z5
Phone: 403 252-1166
Fax: 403 252-4591

Teamster

What is a Teamster?

A teamster is involved in the movement of materials in a wide variety of industries including the agricultural, forestry, health, manufacturing, mining, oil and gas, transportation, and wholesale/retail industries. They are employed by organizations that produce, process and use products such as office supplies, tools and equipment, food goods, textile products, farm equipment or industrial supplies.

  • Hauls men and material
  • Generates and picks orders
  • Packs and ships orders
  • Receives shipments and ensures that they are complete and in good order
  • Processes product returns
  • Schedule deliveries and shipments (schedule items for delivery and co-ordinate the delivery of products to end users)
  • Maintains inventory
  • Operates computer systems
  • Operates non-powered material handling equipment (e.g., dollies, hand trucks, pallet jacks)
  • Operates powered material handling equipment (e.g., forklifts, cranes, conveyers)
  • Works with storage systems
  • Handle and store products (use equipment to move items and place them in appropriate storage areas or bins

Utility Drivers

  • Must possess a high degree of skill in the operation of all types of Tractor Trailer units in moving material and equipment.

Skills & Abilities

The trade appeals to people who enjoy taking a methodical approach to their work, operating handling equipment, and keeping detailed records.

To be successful in the occupation, teamsters need:

  • Physical strength and stamina
  • Manual dexterity
  • The ability to lift up to 25 kilograms
  • The ability to work independently
  • Good math, communication and computer skills
  • The ability to get along well with customers and fellow workers
  • A high knowledge of ‘Hi-way Regulations’ (e.g. permits, cargo securement, weight restrictions, etc.)

Apprenticeship Training

Crane and Hoisting Boom Truck - 1,200 hours of work experience, home study program, five weeks - technical training.

Member Training

  • Transportation of Dangerous Goods
  • Construction Safety Training System (C.S.T.S.)
  • Pipeline Construction Safety Training (P.C.S.T.)
  • Forklift Training: Counterbalance and Rough Terrain
  • Warehouse Testing (Levels I, II & III)
  • Commercial Driver Vehicle Inspection
  • Professional Driving Improvement Course
  • First Aid
  • Computer Training
  • Cargo Securement
  • Basic Rigging
  • Toolhound Training
  • Log Book

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Teamster, contact the International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local 362.

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local 362

International Brotherhood of Teamsters - Local 362 logo

Online

http://www.teamsters362.com
Facebook
Twitter

Location

Calgary

1200A – 58 Avenue S.E.
Calgary, Alberta, T2H 2C9
Phone: (403) 259-4608
Fax: (403) 255-9616
Email: teamcal@teamsters362.com

Edmonton

15035 – 121A Avenue
Edmonton, Alberta, T5V 1N1
Phone: (780) 455-2255
Fax: (780) 455-6976
Email: teamedm@teamsters362.com

Fort McMurray

#14 – 9914 Morrison Street
Fort McMurray, Alberta, T9H 4A4
Phone: (780) 790-9593
Fax: (780) 743-2198


Tower Crane Operator

What is a

Crane and hoisting equipment operators service and operate the hoist and swing equipment used to move machinery, materials and other large objects.Tower crane operatorsservice and operate traveling, fixed, climbing or self-erecting type hoisting equipment with a vertical mast or tower and a jib.

Operators manipulate a number of pedals and levers to rotate the crane, and raise and lower its boom and one or more loadlines. Some or all of these operations may be performed simultaneously.

Tower crane operators are often involved in assembling the crane on-site.

Crane and hoisting equipment operators – tower crane (tower crane operators) work outdoors, often in noisy, dusty conditions. They work in various locations throughout Alberta, in all types of weather. A 40-hour, five-day week is normal, but overtime may be required to meet construction deadlines.

Occupational hazards include injuries resulting from power line contact, crane overload, falls, weather conditions or manual lifting.

Skills & Abilities

Successful operators are capable decision-makers prepared to work independently when necessary. Yet they also enjoy the comradery of being part of a team and traveling to different locations. They often like variety in their work.

To be successful in the trade, tower crane operators need:

  • coordination and manual dexterity
  • the ability to work at heights
  • the strength, stamina, and ability to use proper lifting techniques to lift items weighing in excess of 25 kilograms
  • good vision
  • the ability to work as part of a team and communicate with ground crews, usually using hand signals and voice communication

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for a tower crane operator is 2 years (two 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1000 hours of on-the-job training and 6 weeks of technical training in the first year, and minimum of 1000 hours of on-the-job training in the second year

  • An applicant who previously completed courses of study or work experience related to the Tower Crane Operator trade or holds a related journeyperson certificate and has the employer’s recommendation, may qualify for credit that could reduce the term of apprenticeship. Inquiries about credit for previously completed courses of study or work experience can be directed to an apprentice representative at any Apprenticeship and Industry Training Office.
  • A high school student can become an apprentice and gain credits toward apprenticeship training and a high school diploma at the same time under the Registered Apprenticeship Program (RAP).

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Tower Crane Operator, contact the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 955.

The International Union of Operating Engineers Local 955

International Union of Operating Engineers Local 955 logo

Online

http://www.iuoe955.com

Location

Edmonton

Head Office
17603 - 114 Ave
Edmonton, Alberta T5S 2R9
Phone No. (780) 483-0955
Fax No. (780) 483-1998

Calgary

#201, 1212 - 31 Ave NE
Calgary, Alberta T2E 7S8
Phone No. (403) 250-3840
Fax No. (403) 250-3916

Fort McMurray

258 Gregoire Drive
Fort McMurray, Alberta T9H 4K6
Phone No.(780) 790-1713
Fax No.(780) 743-2582

Edson

#201, 4924-1st Avenue
Edson, Alberta T7E 1T69
Phone No. (780) 723-5955
Fax No. (780) 723-7540

Welder

What is a Welder?

Welders join or sever metals in beams, girders, vessels, piping and other metal components, make metal parts used in construction and manufacturing plants, and weld parts, tools, machines and equipment.

Welding involves applying heat to metal pieces to melt and fuse them together. In electric arc welding, heat is created as an electric current flows through an arc between the tip of the welding electrode and the metal. In gas welding, such as oxyacetylene welding, the flame from the combustion of burning gases melts the metal. In both arc and gas welding, filler materials are melted and added to fill the joint and make it stronger. In resistance welding, the metal piece itself is melted as current flows through it, and no filler is added.

Welders use different welding processes and fillers depending upon the type of metal, its size and shape, and requirements for finished product strength. For a typical welding project, they:

  • Develop patterns for projects or follow directions given in layouts, blueprints and work orders
  • Clean, and check for defects, shape component parts, and use a cutting torch
  • Weld parts together

Welders may also build up worn parts by welding layers of high-strength hard-metal alloys onto them.

Skills & Abilities

To be successful in the trade, welders need:

  • Manual dexterity
  • Good vision (glasses are acceptable)
  • Eye-hand coordination
  • The ability to concentrate on detailed work
  • Patience

Experienced welders may advance to positions such as welding inspector, welding foreman or supervisor, or plant supervisor.

Apprenticeship Training

The term of apprenticeship for a welder is 3 years (three 12-month periods) including a minimum of 1500 hours of on-the-job training and 8 weeks of technical training each year.

To learn the skills required of a welder in Alberta and be issued an Alberta Journeyman Certificate, the minimum requirements are, a pass mark in: English 10-2 and Math 10-3, or, all five Canadian General Educational Development (GED) tests, or, Entrance Exam.

Next steps

To find answers to your questions and learn more about a career as a Welder, contact the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers Local 146, the United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 488 or Local 496, the International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental & Reinforcing Iron Workers Local 720 or Local 725, the Sheet Metal Workers International Local 8, or the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 424 .

International Brotherhood of Boilermakers Local 146

International Brotherhood of Boilermakers - Local 146 logo

Online

http://www.boilermakers.ca

Location

Calgary

11055 - 48 St SE
Calgary, Alberta, T2C 1G8
Phone (403) 253-6976
Fax (403) 252-4187

Edmonton

15330 - 114 Ave
Edmonton, Alberta, T5M 2Z2
Phone (780) 451-5889
Fax (780) 451-3927


United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 488

United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters - Local 488 logo

 Online

http://www.local488.ca

Contact

Calgary

#165, 6223-2 Street SE
Calgary Alberta, T2H 1J5
Phone: 403 253-3516
Fax: 403 253-3534

Edmonton

Pipe Trades Building
16214 118 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, T5V 1M6
Phone: 780 452-7080
Fax: 780 452-1291
info@local488.ca

Fort McMurray

9703A Franklin Avenue
Ft. McMurray AB T9H 1K3
Phone: 780 791-6488v Fax: 780 790-9393


United Association of Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 496

United Association of Journeymen & Apprentices of Plumbing & Pipefitting Industry of the United States & Canada Local 496 logo

Online

http://www.local496.ca

Location

5649 Burbank Road SE
Calgary Alberta, T2H 1Z5
Phone: 403 252-1166
Fax: 403 252-4591

International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental & Reinforcing Iron Workers Local 720

International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Iron Workers Local 720 logo

Online

http://www.ironworkers720.com

Location

10512 - 122 St NW
Edmonton, Alberta T5N 1M6
Phone No. (780) 482-0720
Fax No. (780) 482-0874

International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental & Reinforcing Ironworkers Local 725

International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Ironworkers - Local 725 logo

Online

http://ironworkers725.com
Facebook

Location

6111 - 36 Street, S.E.
Calgary, Alberta T2C 3W2
Phone No. (403) 291-1300
Fax No. (403) 291-2243

Sheet Metal Workers International Local 8

Sheet Metal Workers International - Local 8 logo

Online

http://www.local8.ca
Facebook
YouTube

Location

Calgary

#125, 5723 10 Street NE
Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8W7
Phone: (403) 250-1060 or cell (403) 813-5523
Fax: (403) 250-1061

Edmonton

17310 - 106 Avenue NW
Edmonton, Alberta, T5S 1H9
Phone: (780) 426-3375
Toll-free (in Alberta) 1-800-262-9083
Fax: (780) 426-1694


International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 424

International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers - Local 424 logo

Online

http://www.ibew424.net
Facebook
Twitter
YouTube

Location

Calgary

3623 - 29 St NE
Calgary, Alberta T1Y 5W4
Phone No. (403) 717-0322
Fax No. (403) 717-0326

Edmonton

4232 - 93 St
Edmonton, Alberta T6E 5P5
Phone No. (780) 462-5076
Fax No. (780) 450-0461

Fort McMurray

Suite 206
10020 Franklin Ave
Fort McMurray, Alberta T9H 2K6
Phone No. (780) 791-4727
Fax No. (780) 743-8501